Videogames
(10-14-2018, 08:21 AM)Foolish Wrote: Is anyone else playing DBFZ and Spider-Man right now? I absolutely love both games! Got that platinum on Spider-Man.
Looking forward to Red Dead Redemption 2!

I used to played Dragonball Fighterz a month ago but my online connection was ass. I got nothing but laggy matches so when my shit gets straighten out, I might played it again.
                                                                               

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HE HAS BRING THE RUCKUS
TO ALL YOU MUTHAFUCKAS

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(10-12-2018, 12:36 PM)Shotgun Styles Wrote:
(10-08-2018, 04:43 PM)kcjones Wrote:
(10-05-2018, 04:36 PM)Shotgun Styles Wrote: In the long run everything will be streamed. Consoles are expensive to make and the profit margins on the machines themselves is not great. That's why the console cycle gets longer and  longer each time.

I was looking at the new 5g Verizon system they want to put up in the major cities. A larger number of much smaller cell towers and 1+ gig internet speeds. Give them 7-10 years to build that out in the major markets, and this cloud gaming thing becomes not just viable but preferable to the customer base. Now I can just buy the game, I don't have to buy a $400 console or $1200 gaming computer to play it on.


....And it starts in 2019

Sony and Microsoft HATE making consoles and have been trying to find a way out for years. They are risky, expensive machines to develop and manufacture but the profit margins are pretty thin.

Cloud gaming is the way of the future because it reduces the cost to the consumer while maximizing core processing power. This will also make the replay value of games higher because as the core processing power increases, the graphics can gradually improve. No longer will you have this or that console version of any game. Every major release can be updated to the best and newest resolution.

And eventually, we're going to get the latest Nintendo games on our PCs and personal mobile devices without the use of emulators? Sweet.
                                                                               

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HE HAS BRING THE RUCKUS
TO ALL YOU MUTHAFUCKAS

XD XD XD         
                              
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I've started using Google's Project Stream a couple of days ago, and folks its real. Lag/Latency is little to nonexistent. I have yet to notice any lag, during the 4-5 hours I've put in. The video is like old Netflix. It fluctuates often with your internet bandwidth. The resolution remains static, but the bitrate varies, so you get pixelation like a low bitrate video stream. Despite the video quality fluctuating, the lag or latency remains solid. I've tried it on my Surface Book (Intel HD 520), and my old Alienware M14x (Geforce GT555M), and it runs the same. The limiting factor is really the internet connection, not your systems hardware. This weekend I'll try on some crappy hardware like my old Surface 3 (Atom processor).
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I been playing Call of Duty Black Ops 4 on my PS4 a lot, I have to say it pretty good for not having a single player in it but we know next year COD will have SP again and rumor that it could be Modern Warfare 4 which to I was the best Call of Duty, but the Blackout battle royal is a rip-off of Fortnite. Just like Fornite you get killed once and you don't come back until you tried again. I know it can be fun it all. BTW have anyone play Fornite, Well next week Red Dead Redemption 2 is coming out, and I'm getting it. We have a new trailer tomorrow so I guess it's the online mode which won't be out until next month
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(10-17-2018, 02:19 PM)Shotgun Styles Wrote:
(10-17-2018, 01:17 PM)kcjones Wrote: I've started using Google's Project Stream a couple of days ago, and folks its real.  Lag/Latency is little to nonexistent.  I have yet to notice any lag, during the 4-5 hours I've put in.  The video is like old Netflix.  It fluctuates often with your internet bandwidth.  The resolution remains static, but the bitrate varies, so you get pixelation like a low bitrate video stream.  Despite the video quality fluctuating, the lag or latency remains solid.  I've tried it on my Surface Book (Intel HD 520), and my old Alienware M14x (Geforce GT555M), and it runs the same.  The limiting factor is really the internet connection, not your systems hardware.  This weekend I'll try on some crappy hardware like my old Surface 3 (Atom processor).

Could you do me a favor. Run this test and post your results.

http://www.speedtest.net/

Here are my results over wifi:
Test 1: Download 37.89Mbps, Upload 21.67Mbps, Ping: 6ms
Test 2: Download 40.60Mbps, Upload 25.80Mbps, Ping: 12ms
Test 3: Download 43.30Mbps, Upload 24.26Mbps, Ping: 12ms

My ISP is Verizon Fios, and my plan is 75/75.  Google requires 25Mbps download to use the service, for now.  Gamers will have to stop thinking of graphics is terms of resolution, but in terms of streaming bitrate.  For example Youtube, Netflix, and Blu-ray all offer 1080p video, yet one can easily see the differences between them.  That difference in picture quality is due to the differences in the bitrate.  Gamers who have consoles or PC gaming rigs will love streaming as it allows them to take their games and game saves on the road.  The lower picture quality won't matter give the convenience.  Unfortunately once this takes off, graphics enhancements in games will start to stall, just as itunes stalled the overall advancement in audio files.  The same also happened to video, with the emergence of Netflix.  Netflix movies still don't look as good as Blu-ray or HD DVD, which launched in 2006.
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(10-17-2018, 09:31 PM)kcjones Wrote:
(10-17-2018, 02:19 PM)Shotgun Styles Wrote:
(10-17-2018, 01:17 PM)kcjones Wrote: I've started using Google's Project Stream a couple of days ago, and folks its real.  Lag/Latency is little to nonexistent.  I have yet to notice any lag, during the 4-5 hours I've put in.  The video is like old Netflix.  It fluctuates often with your internet bandwidth.  The resolution remains static, but the bitrate varies, so you get pixelation like a low bitrate video stream.  Despite the video quality fluctuating, the lag or latency remains solid.  I've tried it on my Surface Book (Intel HD 520), and my old Alienware M14x (Geforce GT555M), and it runs the same.  The limiting factor is really the internet connection, not your systems hardware.  This weekend I'll try on some crappy hardware like my old Surface 3 (Atom processor).

Could you do me a favor. Run this test and post your results.

http://www.speedtest.net/

Here are my results over wifi:
Test 1: Download 37.89Mbps, Upload 21.67Mbps, Ping: 6ms
Test 2: Download 40.60Mbps, Upload 25.80Mbps, Ping: 12ms
Test 3: Download 43.30Mbps, Upload 24.26Mbps, Ping: 12ms

My ISP is Verizon Fios, and my plan is 75/75.  Google requires 25Mbps download to use the service, for now.  Gamers will have to stop thinking of graphics is terms of resolution, but in terms of streaming bitrate.  For example Youtube, Netflix, and Blu-ray all offer 1080p video, yet one can easily see the differences between them.  That difference in picture quality is due to the differences in the bitrate.  Gamers who have consoles or PC gaming rigs will love streaming as it allows them to take their games and game saves on the road.  The lower picture quality won't matter give the convenience.  Unfortunately once this takes off, graphics enhancements in games will start to stall, just as itunes stalled the overall advancement in audio files.  The same also happened to video, with the emergence of Netflix.  Netflix movies still don't look as good as Blu-ray or HD DVD, which launched in 2006.

Naw man, we want all of the FPS.

Unrelated,

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