Book recommendations
#11
The thing about the Spenser series is it revolutionized the private eye genre of books His characters Spenser and Hawk, one white, one black, set in the late 70's, through the 80's were the greatest influence on the genre after Dashiell Hammett's Sam Spade and Raymond Chandler's Philip Marlowe. In fact, I think the Chandler family wanted Parker to finish Chandler's last Marlowe book.

Any detective book today with dual heroes or heroines was more than likely influenced by Parker. The yin and yang, good versus evil. The one partner with the skill and wanting to do untold violence, but resisting and showing restraint because of his morality thus allowing his partner, without his permission or prodding of couse, to do what HE knows must be done.

My wife bought me the Spenser For Hire dvd's some years ago and every time I watch them they transport me back to the 80's like nothing else can. Robert Urich and Avery Brooks had to be the most perfect casting EVER!!! Hawk's style and substance was a HUGE influence on my life, sans the killing of course.. I drove his car and wore his style of clothes. He was worldly and educated, yet strret smart, feared and respected in the most dangerous ghettos in Boston. An avid reader, chess player and jazz lover, born in the worst circumstances, yet not allowing that to limit his potential. Even if he had to become a sanctioned killer and muscle, hired by the gov't and the mob, to do it. So, so layered and complex, and written by a white man in the early 70's!!!!

The three greatest black book characters/detectives of this era, IMHO, are Robert B. Parker's Hawk,Walter Mosley's Easy Rawlins and James Patterson's Alex Cross.
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#12
(07-13-2018, 02:07 PM)bmw999 Wrote: The thing about the Spenser series is it revolutionized the private eye genre of books His characters Spenser and Hawk, one white, one black, set in the late 70's, through the 80's were the greatest influence on the genre after Dashiell Hammett's Sam Spade and Raymond Chandler's Philip Marlowe. In fact, I think the Chandler family wanted Parker to finish Chandler's last Marlowe book.

Any detective book today with dual heroes or heroines was more than likely influenced by Parker. The yin and yang, good versus evil. The one partner with the skill and wanting to do untold violence, but resisting and showing restraint because of his morality thus allowing his partner, without his permission or prodding of couse, to do what HE knows must be done.

My wife bought me the Spenser For Hire dvd's some years ago and every time I watch them they transport me back to the 80's like nothing else can. Robert Urich and Avery Brooks had to be the most perfect casting EVER!!! Hawk's style and substance was a HUGE influence on my life, sans the killing of course.. I drove his car and wore his style of clothes. He was worldly and educated, yet strret smart, feared and respected in the most dangerous ghettos in Boston. An avid reader, chess player and jazz lover, born in the worst circumstances, yet not allowing that to limit his potential. Even if he had to become a sanctioned killer and muscle, hired by the gov't and the mob, to do it. So, so layered and complex, and written by a white man in the early 70's!!!!

The three greatest black book characters/detectives of this era, IMHO, are Robert B. Parker's Hawk,Walter Mosley's Easy Rawlins and James Patterson's Alex Cross.

After your ringing endorsement, I will read it in the upcoming weeks. I always have a list of books which I will read next and I have added the Spenser series. I will give it a go and if I like it as much as you do, it will wreck my reading list.

I have read a lot of detective books. Have you read Dennis Lehane’s Patrick Kenzie and Angela Gennaro series? They made a movie of one of the books: Gone, Baby, Gone with Casey Affleck and Morgan Freeman.
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#13
I read Mystic River, because of his ties to George Pelecanos through The Wire. I'll add some to my list. I read any and everything, but I love a series with a black protagonist.

The good thing about RBP is his books aren't too long, so they're quick reads. Also there are 46 books in the series, with Ace Atkins penning the last 7. Hope you enjoy them.
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#14
(07-13-2018, 02:07 PM)bmw999 Wrote: My wife bought me the Spenser For Hire dvd's some years ago and every time I watch them they transport me back to the 80's like nothing else can.  Robert Urich and Avery Brooks had to be the most perfect casting EVER!!!  Hawk's style and substance was a HUGE influence on my life, sans the killing of course..  I drove his car and wore his style of clothes.  He was worldly and educated, yet strret smart, feared and respected in the most dangerous ghettos in Boston. An avid reader, chess player and jazz lover,  born in the worst circumstances, yet not allowing that to limit his potential.  Even if he had to become a sanctioned killer and muscle, hired by the gov't and the mob, to do it.  So, so layered and complex, and written by a white man in the early 70's!!!!

Avery Brooks as Hawk was great. I wanted his sunglasses so bad.



(07-13-2018, 06:42 PM)bmw999 Wrote: I read Mystic River, because of his ties to George Pelecanos through The Wire.  I'll add some to my list.  I read any and everything, but I love a series with a black protagonist.

Don't know if your have read these authors, but I would recommend Walter Mosley's Easy Rawlins series, starting with Devil in a Blue Dress. (It was made into a movie where Don Cheadle actually managed to steal the show from Denzel Washington.)

David Simon's (of The Wire) non-fiction works when he was a crime reporter in Baltimore. Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets, and The Corner: A Year in the Life of an Inner-City Neighborhood.

And my favorite fictional detectives, Harlem's own Coffin Ed and Gravedigger Jones from Chester Himes. Himes is one of my favorite authors. His opening paragraph to Cotton Comes to Harlem is one of the best ever.
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#15
I love some of those old dudes like Himes, but a lot of them aren't available on kindle.
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#16
(07-13-2018, 06:42 PM)Chessmaster Wrote: I read Mystic River, because of his ties to George Pelecanos through The Wire. I'll add some to my list. I read any and everything, but I love a series with a black protagonist.

The good thing about RBP is his books aren't too long, so they're quick reads. Also there are 46 books in the series, with Ace Atkins penning the last 7. Hope you enjoy them.

I saw that some of the books were around 200 pages. I will read that in a few hours. That's a big selling point and I will check them out soon.

Have you read Abe Glitsky Series by John Lescroart? It has a black protagonist. The only negative thing to say is that it only has three books.

PS, I was confused by the name change.
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#17
The name change was from the old board. Sorry about that.

Yes, Lescroart is on my list from my earlier post. I like his writing style, but some of his books are waaaaaay too long. I've read 7 of the Dismas Hardy/Abe Glitsky series, but for some reason Guilt/Glitsky #2 isn't available on kindle. Every book after that one is available. Go figure.

As I wrote before, I scour the net for books, preferably series with black protagonists. Easy Rawlins, Fearless Jones, Leonid McGill, Abe Glitsky, Alex Cross, Lew Griffin, Wesley Farrell, Hannibal Jones, Stark & O'Brien, Gideon, Charlie Noble, C.J. Floyd, Devil Barnett, Aaron Gunner, Laary Cole, Smokey Dalton, Ivan Monk, Sam Becket, Louis Kincaid, Derek Strange, Hap & Leonard, Tennyson Hardwick, Detective Barrett Raines & Ralph "Rat" Trapp are most of my quality finds.
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#18
Stephen King is the Shakespeare of our time. No author in history has had more separate individual works adapted to film and TV. He's written successfully in every genre from Historical, to Horror, to Suspense, to Drama, to Science Fiction. He is prolific, popular, and eclectically skilled.

Because of his horror roots, his impact on literature will not be respected until he is dead.
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#19
The fourth turning,it's about the cycles of generational change and how that effects current ,future and past events
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