Bill requiring school elective Bible course passes FL House Education panel
#1
Dodgy

http://www.mysuncoast.com/2019/03/07/bil...n-panel-2/
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#2
Fastest way to become an atheist is to read the bible. I went to school outside of the US and Christianity was shoved down my throat. As a result a majority of people that I went to school with are atheists. I'm not so sure this is a bad thing once they don't cherry pick like churches do.
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#3
(03-24-2019, 12:30 PM)tox20 Wrote: Fastest way to become an atheist is to read the bible. I went to school outside of the US and Christianity was shoved down my throat. As a result a majority of people that I went to school with are atheists. I'm not so sure this is a bad thing once they don't cherry pick like churches do.



FYI this is one of the main proponents of the bill.

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#4
Yeah shes bat shit crazy. If they cherry pick the good parts there are sure to be more brainless Christians that turn a blind eye to anything scientific but it people are exposed to Christianity and can read the good book on their own I swear their is no faster way to promote atheism. This could have the opposite affect.
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#5
I'm torn over this. I just don't think proponents of this, and the teachers/students who choose to participate will be able to stay objectively neutral, especially in the areas of this state that aren't Palm Beach, Dade, Broward, and to a lesser extent Alachua counties. These sound more like history classes viewed through a lens of the Bible, similar to English literature classes that analyze the Bible itself as just another work; finding Biblical symbolism (quite common) would be pretty difficult without the background knowledge. For HS, this just seems like an all around bad idea, because we all know what happens from here. Non-Christians want to be afforded the same opportunity, Christians become irate, the ACLU somehow gets involved, and there is a big dust up over nothing.
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#6
(03-22-2019, 11:51 AM)Shotgun Styles Wrote: This will never survive a court challenge.

I am fine with "allowing" schools to do this. Nothing wrong with a Bible study elective, so long as it's not used to proselytize. But "requiring" is going to get this law killed in the courts.

Exactly.  The easiest way to beat this in court would be for an orthodox Jew or muslim to argue that State of Florida is going against the religious establishment clause in the constitution, by favoring Christianity over all other religions.  Anyone who voted for this deserves to lose their position.  I'm a Christian, and very offended by this.  Only an idiot believes one can legislate spirituality.
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#7
After being in Catholic Schools from 7-12th grade where we were required to take a Catholic religious courses (even if you weren't Catholic) every year, if there is one thing I really can't do in this world, it's religion. I fully support everyone's desire to practice their religion though. I don't see how this can happen and it ends positively. If they do it for one religion then they are going to have to do it with all of them and if they say no then their asses are going to be severely burned.
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#8
it's elective, which means its not required. so it's not a big deal.
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#9
Yeah, you can't LEGALLY REQUIRE public schools to have religion classes, elective or no. I do think that religion classes told from a 3rd person perspective about the origins, general beliefs and philosophies, and the relationship between religion and government could be good. My Catholic school had the typical religious propaganda classes, but it also had a religion class (it was either 3rd year+ or an elective) that was done like I laid out above. 

But this is America we're talking about, no one cares about all that shit.
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#10
(04-02-2019, 04:48 PM)Spops Wrote: Yeah, you can't LEGALLY REQUIRE public schools to have religion classes, elective or no. I do think that religion classes told from a 3rd person perspective about the origins, general beliefs and philosophies, and the relationship between religion and government could be good. My Catholic school had the typical religious propaganda classes, but it also had a religion class (it was either 3rd year+ or an elective) that was done like I laid out above. 

But this is America we're talking about, no one cares about all that shit.

Those classes are normally titled "Comparative Religions" and are commonly taught in high schools and colleges everywhere.
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