Get Out Horror Film
#11
Too SCARY it would give me nightmares. Wink
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#12
Yep, I would definitely SMASH! IDGAF how scary that Get Out movie is.
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#13
If its there I'd smash, but I wouldn't pursue her. She has very masculine facial features. So will the sequel be an asian girl visiting her new white boyfriends parents?
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#14
Yeah, that second picture Baked posted is not doing her any favors. That hairstyle really doesn't suit her facial features. She needs to wear her hair down/in a more feminine manner to soften her looks more. The third picture is a better representation of what she looks like when styled appropriately.

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#15
Saw the movie. It was good, with one major caveat. All you dudes saying "pass" are lying ass sacks of shit. You'd hit.


*SPOILERS*






















This is a well written, well shot, well acted movie. From a technical standpoint they hit on all the bases. Sound film making on every level. The movie is also a lot less about race than it appears. You could have written the story as old vs. young instead of Black vs. white and essentially had the same story and had it be just as good. That's how strong the central premise and plot are.

As a horror film it doesn't really work because it's not scary. As a spoof of horror films (which it is intended to be) it works perfectly. The music and shot selection are very reminiscent of 80s and early 90s thrillers. The sense of nostalgia is palpable all the way down to the ending sequence on a darkened road in the woods.

My one criticism, and it's a serious one, is that like "Dear White People" and "Brothers" and "Jungle Fever" and others this film is yet another indictment of Black male/White female relationships. The first half of the film in refreshing in that it shows a loving affectionate relationship between the two. This is rare in cinema. Usually tenderness and affection between these two groups is not apparent even if the relationship is sexual in nature. But then, of course, either the white woman or the Black man has to become a villain so everyone can leave the theater satisfied that their prejudices were justified. In this case, it's the woman who turns out to be the monster.

I want to like this movie because of all the things it does right. But I'm forced to reject it because it does the one thing wrong that it couldn't survive. Ultimately, Get Out is as racist a movie as the slave owning characters it portrays. It would have been better to make this movie without the racial context so the snake doesn't eat it's own tail.
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#16
So the black man married to a white woman made a "film [that] is yet another indictment of Black male/White female relationships"?

I could imagine several ways to read and interpret the presented themes, but I think it's a stretch to read it as racist or intentionally hostile to interracial coupling.
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#17
I don't agree with Stylez on this (not on that girl either, but whatever). I think the movie was just as much about the condescending compassion of overly PC liberals than about southern slavery. You see all these post-race white people these days who like the concept of black people, but make no attempt to actually learn what we're about. They treat minorities the way a person might treat a pet and that form of reverse-racism can be just as bad.

However, I do agree with him that the movie was not scary, but funny instead.
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#18
vesuvius Wrote:I don't agree with Stylez on this (not on that girl either, but whatever). I think the movie was just as much about the condescending compassion of overly PC liberals than about southern slavery. You see all these post-race white people these days who like the concept of black people, but make no attempt to actually learn what we're about. They treat minorities the way a person might treat a pet and that form of reverse-racism can be just as bad.

However, I do agree with him that the movie was not scary, but funny instead.


I didn't see anything racist about the portrayal of the interracial relationship. The premise was ridiculously over the top, even to those it should be pandering to. I also agree the movie wasn't very scary. There are plenty of interviews by Jordan Peele regarding the movie. Stylez should look up one or two.
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#19
I understand what Shotgun is getting at, and I think the movie does have a problem with its portrayal of the central relationship, but it is not because of racism; rather, it's because Peele's film is an unhappy marriage of genres that don't fully complement each other and leave a muddled result.

The problem, as I see it, is that the first 2/3 of the movie is spent mostly functioning as social satire leveled at the "woke" white liberals who are the main butt of the movie's joke. Although it's meant to be over-the-top just how fixated on his race these people are, it works as satire because it is merely exaggerating (maybe not that much) how so many white liberals who flatter themselves as being open-minded continue to struggle with race. These people are portrayed as being more ridiculous than they are frightening; and all throughout, the protagonist's GF is the only white person who seems even slightly aware of how utterly insensitive and condescending everyone else is behaving towards him. She is the personification of White Guilt.

But in the final 1/3 Peele flips the script, abandoning the lighter humour in order to double down on the horror conventions, and so the sympathetic white GF character naturally has to go over to the dark side. This is where the problem lies, because there is nothing established in her character to make that believable except within the conventions of a horror movie, where EVERYONE is out to get you (except your one black friend at the TSA). Which is fine. But that's where his commentary on real life racism slips a gear, and where the movie starts to feel flat. As many have stated, it's not that scary. But more importantly, the earlier satire of subtle, pervasive racism is now abandoned for outright paranoia where even your loving, clearly-not-racist girlfriend is actually a secret body snatcher planning to enslave you in her cult of cultural appropriation. I think this (unintentionally) risks suggesting that IR relationships are ultimately impossible, because how can you ever truly know that your outwardly caring and sensitive partner isn't secretly harbouring a deep well of racism towards you?
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#20
un57 Wrote:But in the final 1/3 Peele flips the script, abandoning the lighter humour in order to double down on the horror conventions, and so the sympathetic white GF character naturally has to go over to the dark side. This is where the problem lies, because there is nothing established in her character to make that believable except within the conventions of a horror movie, where EVERYONE is out to get you (except your one black friend at the TSA). Which is fine. But that's where his commentary on real life racism slips a gear, and where the movie starts to feel flat. As many have stated, it's not that scary. But more importantly, the earlier satire of subtle, pervasive racism is now abandoned for outright paranoia where even your loving, clearly-not-racist girlfriend is actually a secret body snatcher planning to enslave you in her cult of cultural appropriation. I think this (unintentionally) risks suggesting that IR relationships are ultimately impossible, because how can you ever truly know that your outwardly caring and sensitive partner isn't secretly harbouring a deep well of racism towards you?


This is it right here. At the front of the movie you really get sucked in by the possibilities. But in the end all the redeeming factors of race relations are blown up in favor of a "body snatchers" narrative. I think you can make the story work without making the girlfriend in on it. In fact, that narrative is more indicative of BM/WF relationships because often the white girl has to defy her family in order to maintain the relationship.
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